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  • br Conflict of interest br The

    2022-09-14


    Conflict of interest
    The authors declare that they A23187 have no conflict of interest.
    Transparency document
    The Transparency document associated with this article can be found, in online version.
    Acknowledgments
    We are grateful to the Centro Nacional de Bioimagem (CENABIO) for the use of the super-resolution microscopy facility and to all mem-bers of the laboratory, particularly to Dr. Julio-de-Freitas Junior and Dr. Wallace Martins de Araujo, for assistance with assays and for the con-stant discussion concerning the manuscript. This text was revised by Editage from Rockfeller University Press.
    Appendix A. Supplementary data
    References
    A.C.M. Sousa-Squiavinato et al.
    429  ARTICLE IN PRESS
    Current Problems in Cancer xxx (xxxx) xxx
    Contents lists available at ScienceDirect
    Current Problems in Cancer
    journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/cpcancer
    Cognitive and emotional representations of pain in cancer patients at an inpatient unit and home palliative care
    Agata Zdun-Ryzewska˙ a,∗, Gabriela Chojnacka-Szawłowska b, Krzysztof Basinski´ a, Wojciech Leppert c, Mikolaj Majkowicz d a Quality of Life Department, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk,´ Poland b Department of Psychology, University of Finance and Management, Warsaw, Poland
    c Department of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland d Pomeranian Academy in Slupsk, Institute of Health Sciences, Slupsk, Poland
    Keywords:
    Beliefs
    Cancer
    Pain
    Palliative care
    Treatment
    Purpose: To compare symptomatic treatment at inpatient pal-liative care unit and at home in terms of: pain intensity; neg-ative impact of pain on functioning in different areas of life; and beliefs about pain (cognitive and emotional aspects ac-cording to Leventhal’s theory).
    Patients: The sample consisted of 74 cancer patients qualified for palliative care at an inpatient unit (N = 53) and at home (N = 21).
    Methods: Brief Pain Inventory––Short Form (measurement of pain intensity and pain interference with daily activi-ties), Karnofsky Scale (performance status), Illness Percep-tion Questionnaire for cognitive and emotional representa-tions and beliefs about pain, and Hospital Anxiety and De-pression Scale.
    Results: Patients treated at inpatient unit and patients treated at home did not differ in terms of pain intensity, depres-sion, and anxiety. The only significant differences between groups were the beliefs about pain. Patients with cancer in
    ★ Conflicts of interest: None. ∗ Correspondence to: Agata Zdun-Ryzewska,˙ Quality of Life Department, Medical University of Gdansk, Tuwima 15, 80-140 Gdansk,´ Poland.
    E-mail address: [email protected] (A. Zdun-Ryzewska)˙.
    Please cite this article as: A. Zdun-Ryzewska,˙ G. Chojnacka-Szawłowska and K. Basinski´ et al., Cognitive and emotional representations of pain in cancer patients at an inpatient unit and home palliative care, Current Problems in Cancer, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.currproblcancer.2019.01.005
    ARTICLE IN PRESS
    2 A. Zdun-Ryzewska,˙ G. Chojnacka-Szawłowska and K. Basinski´ et al. / Current Problems in Cancer xxx (xxxx) xxx
    home care were more convinced of pain treatment effective-ness but expressed higher level of distress related to pain. Patients convinced that pain can be treated more effectively were younger, the pain GT-AC rule experienced was less severe, and they were treated at home.
    Conclusions: Effectiveness of symptomatic treatment is com-parable in patients with cancer at inpatient unit and at home. Treatment at home is associated with stronger patient convictions that pain can be effectively treated and higher level of distress. In future studies, the source of higher dis-tress intensity in patients treated A23187 at home may be further explored.
    Introduction